The Science of Dreams Pt. 1

The Science of Dreams is a parallel piece by two undocumented science majors that covers each writers perspectives on science in the undocumented community. Juan is majoring in Electrical Engineering and Minhaz has a degree in Neuroscience.

By Juan S

Scientists and Dreamers have a lot of things in common. Both push the limits of a problem until they find a solution. Both pursue their dreams at any cost.

Yet, it’s interesting that not many Dreamers pursue an academic interest in science. There’s nothing wrong with majoring in other fields; History, English, and other areas are important. But it seems like the number of undocumented students who major in science is low.

The more Dreamers who pursue science, the higher possibility for a DREAM Act (or better yet a comprehensive immigration reform) to pass. Why? Because we are at a point where in this country where we can’t let this talent go. It’s hurting the U.S. In recent years, the U.S’s science and technology fields have suffered a rapid decline both intellectually and in the job market. There is a void to fill and it already exists here! Right under our noses.

The more undocumented students come out as majoring in science and technology, the more likely a reform/amnesty will happen. It makes a lot of sense to find a path for legalization of these brilliant minds. A lot of the talent is here already! There is no need for the U.S to import engineers, chemist, biologist, doctors, or mathematician to the U.S. All the talent is homegrown. The greatest loss will be that most of us might be forced to leave to other countries where we would be given a chance to use our talents.

There’s a part of me that thinks many undocumented people do not pursue science for a few reasons. If you are a person of color (except, perhaps, of Asian decent) then you probably feel alone in these fields. If you do find someone like you, then you might become buddies with him or her. You share that same unspoken awkwardness of being one of the few black or brown students in class.  The amount of internships and job opportunities might seem minimal because of our status and ethnic background.

But Dreamers shouldn’t quit. We are scientists in our own right. We find solutions to our problems even when people call us crazy; say that our ideas seem impossible. We will always find a way. We will always find an answer. We will. We wont stop dreaming.

Juan S is an electrical engineer major planning to transfer from a CCSF to a four year institution. A community/student organizer in San Francisco, he also likes sports (especially baseball, college wrestling, and brazilian jiu jitsu), music, and tattoos. He eats a ridiculous amount of food for such a tiny person. He also like hugs and stuffed animals. Seriously.

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Comments

3 Responses to “The Science of Dreams Pt. 1”
  1. Jose says:

    Well in all honesty I don’t think that’s a reason they don’t major in science. I’ve actually met a lot of undocumented teens in high school who want to become nurses. Our race has nothing to do with our career choices. At least in my opinion.

  2. Princess Elitininanesi says:

    WWWWWWWOOOOOWWWWWWW! Never thought about it in this way. You can say you’ve opened my eyes to a whole different area when it comes to thinking! thanks Juan

  3. Juan S says:

    I totally understand where you are coming from Jose. Race absolutely has nothing to do with what people major in. However, you cannot deny that certain groups of people major in the sciences. Nothing wrong with it just an observation. The amount of students who actually major in the sciences of who are Latin American or of Latin American decent is pretty small in the U.S. Wanting to major and actually majoring are two different things.

    At San Francisco’s City College, the nursing program requires one to be a ssn. To me that is insane, sad, and pathetic.

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